“What are you?” – Clinical Complexities of Biracial Identity

Linda Bortell Psy.D. “I hate that question” a biracial college freshman lamented to me. “People look at me and it’s almost like I’m not a person because they don’t know what kind of person I am.” She was discussing being biracial (African-American and Caucasian) and feeling like people NEEDED to find a category for . . . → Read More: “What are you?” – Clinical Complexities of Biracial Identity

Amicus Brief

“Amicus Brief” or “Amicus Curia” are writings addressed to the Court, on the issues before it, by the persons with strong interest in or views on the issues, who are not a party to the action. We have selected this title to create a free tribunal and publish writings by our esteemed visiting colleagues . . . → Read More: Amicus Brief

Linda Bortell, Psy.D: Change as a Constant in Multicultural Competency

Racial tensions and aggressions continue to evolve in this country in more subtle and covert ways. This “new” form of racism is more difficult to acknowledge and identify (Sue, et al, 2007). These racial microaggressions can be a therapist using Eurocentric language, unconscious looks, gestures or tones. The “perpetrator” of these (read: therapist) overlooks these or dismisses the act because they were not aware of it. However, the “victim” (read: patient) sees these small things and may be unable to relegate it to a nonevent. The patient may shift what they say and how they disclose in therapy based on these microaggressions. . . . → Read More: Linda Bortell, Psy.D: Change as a Constant in Multicultural Competency

Alexandra Leichter Esq.: Jewish Holiday Guide For Custody/Visitation Schedule

Revised Jan. 2010 [ Prior versions of this article were printed in the L.A. County Bar Association Family Law News & Review, Vol. XX, No.2, Spring 1999, and in the Family Law News, Official Publication of the State Bar of California Family Law Section, Vol 29, No.2, 2007.] Most family law attorneys shy away from religious holiday scheduling because they incorrectly assume that the courts are Constitutionally prohibited from allocating religious holidays. But the case law often cited i does not prevent the court from considering religious practices and observances in devising appropriate time-share arrangements. Those cases merely preclude, absent a showing of “harm”, the court from restraining either party from allowing their children’s participation in various religious activities or observances. List of Holidays:… . . . → Read More: Alexandra Leichter Esq.: Jewish Holiday Guide For Custody/Visitation Schedule